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THE LOGIC OF CAUSATION

© Avi Sion, 1999, 2000; 2003, 2005; 2008, 2010  All rights reserved.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS.

Contents in brief:

Abstract

Phase One: Macroanalysis

1. The Paradigm of Causation

2. The Generic Determinations

3. The Specific Determinations

4. Immediate Inferences

5. Causative Syllogism

  

6. Lists of Positive Moods

7. Reduction of Positive Moods

8. Matricial Analyses

9. Squeezing Out More Information

 

10. Wrapping Up Phase One

Appendix J.S. Mill’s Methods

Phase Two: Microanalysis

 

11. Piecemeal Microanalysis

12. Systematic Microanalysis

13. Some More Microanalyses

14. Main Three-Item Syllogisms

15. Some More Three-Item Syllogisms

16. Outstanding Issues

Appendix: Grand Matrices

Phase Three: Software Assisted Analysis

 

17. Resuming the Research

18. Moduses of the Forms

19. Defining Causation

20. Concerning Complements

21. Causative Syllogisms

22. Scanning for Conclusions

23. Exploring Further Afield

24. A Practical Guide to Causative Logic

Tables and Diagrams

References

Contents in detail:

ABSTRACT

Phase One: Macroanalysis.

1.THE PARADIGM OF CAUSATION

  1. Causation.

  2. The Paradigmic Determination.

2. THE GENERIC DETERMINATIONS

  1. Strong Determinations.

  2. Parallelism of Strongs.

  3. Weak Determinations.

  4. Parallelism of Weaks.

  5. The Four Genera of Causation.

  6. Negations of Causation.

3. THE SPECIFIC DETERMINATIONS

  1. The Species of Causation.

  2. The Joint determinations.

  3. The Significance of Certain Findings.

4. IMMEDIATE INFERENCES

  1. Oppositions.

  2. Eductions.

  3. The Directions of Causation.

5. CAUSATIVE SYLLOGISM

  1. Causal or Effectual Chains.

  2. Some Instructive Examples.

  3. Figures and Moods.

6. LIST OF POSITIVE MOODS

  1. Valid and Invalid Moods.

  2. Moods in Figure 1.

  3. Moods in Figure 2.

  4. Moods in Figure 3.

7. REDUCTION OF POSITIVE MOODS

  1. Reduction.

  2. Reductions in Figure 1.

  3. Reductions in Figure 2.

  4. Reductions in Figure 3.

8. MATRICIAL ANALYSES

  1. Matricial Analysis.

  2. Crucial Matricial Analyses in Figure 1.

  3. Crucial Matricial Analyses in Figure 2.

  4. Crucial Matricial Analyses in Figure 3.

9. SQUEEZING OUT MORE INFORMATION

  1. The Interactions of Determinations.

  2. Negative Moods.

  3. Negative Conclusions from Positive Moods.

  4. Imperfect Moods.

10. WRAPPING UP PHASE ONE

  1. Highlights of Findings.

  2. Modes of Causation.

     
  3. Gaps and Loose Ends.

Appendix: J. S. MILL’S METHODS: A Critical Analysis

Preamble.

  1. The Joint Method of Agreement and Difference.

  2. The Method of Agreement.

  3. The Method of Difference.

  4. The Method of Residues.

  5. The Method of Concomitant Variations.

Concluding Remarks.

Phase Two: Microanalysis.

 

11.PIECEMEAL MICROANALYSIS

  1. Binary Coding and Unraveling.

  2. The Generic Determinations.

  3. Contraction and Expansion.

  4. Intersection, Nullification and Merger.

  5. Negation.

 

12. SYSTEMATIC MICROANALYSIS

  1. Grand Matrices.

  2. Moduses in a Two-Item Framework.

  3. Catalogue of Moduses, for Three Items.

  4. Enumeration of Moduses, for Three Items.

  5. Comparing Frameworks.

 13. SOME MORE MICROANALYSES
  1. Relatives Weaks.

  2. Items of Negative Polarity in Two-Item Framework.

  3. Items of Negative Polarity in Three-Item Framework.

  4. Categoricals and Conditionals.

 

14. MAIN THREE-ITEM SYLLOGISMS

  1. Applying Microanalysis to Syllogism.

  2. The Moduses of Premises.

  3. The Moduses of Conclusions.

  4. Dealing with Vaguer Propositions.

 

15. SOME MORE THREE-ITEM SYLLOGISMS

  1. Special Cases of Three-Item Syllogism.

  2. Dealing with Negatives.

 

16. OUTSTANDING ISSUES

  1. Four-Item Syllogism.

  2. On Laws of Causation.

  3. Interdependence.

  4. Other Features of Causation Worthy of Study.

  Appendix: GRAND MATRICES
  1. Catalogue of moduses for the four conjunctions of two items (P, R).

  2. Catalogue of moduses for the eight conjunctions of three items (P, Q, R).

Phase Three: Software Assisted Analysis.

 

17. RESUMING THE RESEARCH.

  1. History of the Research.

  2. Matrices of the Frameworks.

  3. Comparing Frameworks.

18. MODUSES OF THE FORMS.

  1. 2-Item Framework Moduses.

  2. 3-Item Framework Moduses.

  3. 4-Item Moduses of the Forms.

  4. Interpretation of the Moduses.

19. DEFINING CAUSATION.

  1. Back to the Beginning.

  2. The Puzzle of No Non-connection.

  3. The Definition of Causation.

  4. Oppositions and Other Inferences.

20. CONCERNING COMPLEMENTS.

  1. Reducing Numerous Complements to Just Two.

  2. Dependence Between Complements.

  3. Exclusive Weak Causation.

  4. The Need for an Additional Item (or Two).

21. CAUSATIVE SYLLOGISMS.

  1. Methodology.

  2. 3-Item Syllogisms.

  3. 4-Item Syllogisms.

  4. About 5-item Syllogism.

22. Scanning for Conclusions.

  1. Methodology.

  2. Forms Studied and their Oppositions.

  3. 3-Item Syllogisms.

  4. 4-Item Syllogisms.

23. Exploring Further Afield.

  1. Possible Forms of Premises.

  2. Dealing with Negative Items.

  3. Preventive Syllogisms and their Derivatives.

  4. Syllogisms with Negative Premise(s).

  5. Causal Logic Perspective.

24. A Practical Guide to Causative Logic.

  1. What is Causation?

  2. How is Causation Known?

  3. A List of the Main Causative Arguments.

  4. Closing Remark.

TABLES AND DIAGRAMS

References

About “Causal Logic”

See also: Ruminations, chapter 8.

 

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2016-08-23T09:53:29+00:00